Malala Speaks Up (Again) for Syrian Children

 

In this powerful video, Malala has hope that the Syrian child refugees will survive and one day be able to return home.  That hope, however, is dampened by the grave concerns she has for what may be the irreparable damage that has been done to these young lives.  The statistics are as staggering as they are frightening.

Malala tells their story for the world to hear.

It doesn’t have to be that way!  Syrian children need money for an education.  Let’s help them come home and rebuild their country.

 

The Refugee Crisis: It’s About Mending, Not Building Fences

When I created this blog, it was not my intention to use it as a political mouthpiece.  Recent events in the political arena, however, have been anything but typical.  I’ll come back to that in a moment.

Even where there are walls, there should be open doorways.

Even where there are walls, there should be open doorways.

Last week, a heart-rending photo of a little boy washed up on the beach received tremendous exposure, thanks to the power of the social media.  There is no need to display the photo here; I am sure most readers know exactly which photo I am referring to.  As with all warfare, children are disproportionately affected.  Among huge numbers of refugees fleeing the despair that is Syria, Iraq, Iran, and parts of North Africa are more children than anyone can count, on which the UNHCR has reported.  That little Syrian boy – here is who he was.  At least that once innocent child from Syria on the beach now has a name, Aylan Kurdi.  Beyond the love of his parents, he had little else.

About those recent political happenings… The ones I am referring to are the insidious and pugnacious remarks by Donald Trump in his quest for his presidential nomination.  He and his GOP counterparts are racing to score political points, ranting about the dangers “Mexican rapists” pose (as the true ignorant bigot he his, Mr. Trump wraps up Mexicans, Hondurans, Salvadorans, Guatemalans, and other Latinos in a single stereotyped adjectives), while a genuine crisis looms across the Atlantic, one not seen since the dark days of Nazism.  Their diatribe trivializes the unfolding tragedy of the refugees, the families, and their children, of which that little Syrian boy is an example.  The whole spectacle is sickening.  What we now confront is no less than moral catastrophe.  For now, a growing number of Democrats in Congress are urging the US to do its part.

Individuals are also being called on to do their part.  After all, says New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof, these refugees are people who could be us and probably were our parents or grandparents.  “Love the stranger, because that stranger could be us,” extols Rabbi Jonathan Sacks.  Rabbi Sacks brought up the Kindertransport during an NPR interview, when Nicholas Winton organized the transfer of more than 10,000 Jewish children to England, saving their lives from the maws of the Nazi monster.

Hideous cartoons such as this are what follow when solipsistic individuals hijack important social issues to serve their own narrow ends.

Hideous cartoons such as this are what follow when solipsistic individuals hijack important social issues to serve their own narrow ends.

For political games in the US, it needs to be “Game Over.”  As Nobel Laureate Malala Yousafzai urged, we need to call on our leaders, our representatives.  And Charity Navigator has set up a page to help donors decide on a charity that would put funds to best use.  “Tear down that wall!”  Now is the time for people to come together for all of humanity and mend fences, not build them.

Bring Back Our Girls – One Year Later. Malala: “You Are My Heroes.”

BringBackOurGirls 01 r

On this, the anniversary of the kidnapping of school girls in Nigeria, I would like to take the time to remember tham.  On Tuesday, April 14, Malala Yousafzai wrote an impassioned letter on their behalf.  “I look forward to the day I can hug each one of you, pray with you, and celebrate your freedom with your families. Until then, stay strong, and never lose hope. You are my heroes.”  For more information, the Huffington Post issued a detailed article with many links.

I took this photo during a 2005 concert of the African Children’s Choir and adapted it in 2014, as I felt it expresses the power of African girls beautifully.

Shalom.  Salaam.
‪#‎BringBackOurGirls‬

The 2014 Nobel Peace Prize: A Stunning Endorsement of Peace and the Welfare of Children

The awarding of the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize to Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani Muslim, and Kailash Satyarthi, an Indian Hindu, comes as such welcome news! It’s a powerful endorsement of peace among different nations and faiths, as well as the welfare of children.  This news is very much in line with Janusz Korczak’s philosophy of the Child’s Right to Respect.
http://huff.to/1snrtfp

Education for Girls Worldwide Must Become a Priority.

According to a group, A World at School, some 57 million children do not have access to a basic education. Women and girls are disproportionately affected. 

Remember Malala?  On July 12, less than a year after she was shot by the Taliban for her strong voice in this fight. Malala Yousafzai will mark her 16th birthday by delivering the highest leadership of the UN a set of education demands written by youth, for youth, to United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.  The child’s right to an education is central to the UN Declaration of the Rights of the Child, that extraordinary document that was inspired by the teachings of Janusz Korczak, both in his life and his writings, especially The Child’s Right to Respect and How to Love a Child.

Here’s one way we can show our solidarity with Malala:  Please sign this letter to Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to show your demand for emergency action in support for Malala’s education fight.

http://secure.aworldatschool.org/page/s/stand-with-malala